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Shocking numbers that show the financial toll of ignoring sexual harassment

Ever wonder if sexual harassment is really as pervasive as the #MeToo movement made it seem? Well surveys are in, and it might actually be worse. Surveys (by Marketplace-Edison and Stop Street Harassment) show that more than 35 million women in the United States have had their careers and finances impacted by sexual harassment. The surveys show that of the women you know, more than 3 out of 4 have experienced some form of sexual harassment. Of that group, 1 in 3 has experienced sexual harassment at work; 1 in 6 has quit her job or changed careers because of sexual harassment. 1 in 4 has experienced sexual assault. Only 1 in 100 is likely to have confronted a harasser. A woman is more likely

Nurses, Models, Actresses, Lawyers and Jobs That Require You to Tolerate Harassment

When Julia came to me, she was one of the many women I’ve talked to who was working as a nurse in a long-term elder care facility. Her supervisors had explained to her that they were really good at tolerating touching and inappropriate comments from patients, and they could teach her to tolerate it better. Julia was not interested in tolerating sexual harassment, and so she left her job. Still, when Julia explained to me what happened, she blamed herself – as a nurse, maybe she was supposed to tolerate sexual harassment. Maybe that was just what the job required. Unfortunately, that type of thinking is common in many professions. In the law, we justify harassment saying that lawyers have a h

You're not making too big a deal of this.

One of the most common reactions I see women have to a harassing experience is just silent shock. Our bodies often freeze up, and sometimes we go into a panic as though we might die. The sad thing about this is that we have reactions like this to experiences that are not actually physically threatening as often as those that are. So, why is that? What I have observed through hundreds of conversations with women who have experienced harassment is that self-censorship plays an important part in our freeze response. Thoughts like, “I can’t believe this is happening,” and “I’m making too big a deal of this,” keep us stuck, frozen, and stop us from actually addressing and ending harassment. Our f

Is "Bro-Culture" Inherently Sexist?

A woman sued Google last week, saying that she experienced sexual harassment in Google’s “bro-culture.” I won’t go into what she alleges that she experienced because you can read that for yourself if you like, but it got me thinking about what creates “bro-culture.” Is it just that groups of men, when they’re together, will gravitate towards gang-like behavior? Is it the same with women? I don’t think it’s that simple. What is bro-culture? To me, the word bro-culture is so evocative of a specific image that it is difficult to even unpack what it means. I will do my best. A bro is an entitled man, usually white, who has enough money to dress in expensive sports-related clothes and acts like a

I'm publishing a book!

As you may have heard, I’m publishing my first book Career Defense 101: Is Your Career Safe From Sexism? this Tuesday, March 6, 2018! Many people have asked how they can help, thank you! On publishing day you can download and read my book, then post a review of it on Amazon! I’ll be sending out the link when it’s live. And here’s one other way you can help me get the buzz going: On March 6 at 2pm ET (11am PT) The Author Incubator is hosting a free online launch party featuring me along with some other amazing authors. We’ll be giving away links to download all our books to everyone who attends, as well as $1,000s of free personal development and self-help resources! Could you do me a favor a

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